Terrace Road Veterinary Hospital

Exceptional medicine, extraordinary dedication, excellent care

Physical Address

95 Terrace Road

Edenvale

Johannesburg

1609

Pet Articles

My cat's eyes are swollen and teary

Conjunctivitis in Cats

What is conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the conjunctiva. The conjunctiva is the thin semi-transparent mucous membrane lining the inside of the eyelids, covering the third eyelid. This membrane attaches to the globe of the eye at the level of the sclera (the white part of the eye). The back end of the word conjunctivitis (– itis) refers to inflammation which is a defense mechanism of the body and means swelling, redness, increased heat to the local area because of an increase in blood flow to the affected area, and pain or discomfort. Conjunctivitis is a very common condition affecting

There is something wrong with my dog's eyes

Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca - Dry eye

What is “dry eye?”

Keratocunjunctivitis Sicca (KCS) or dry eye as it is commonly known, is a condition found in humans and animals where the eyes do not produce enough tears or moisture for the eyeballs to stay moist and shiny.

My dog has what looks like a red cherry stuck in the corner of its eye

Cherry eyes in pets

Introduction to cherry eye

My dog's nose seems to be all clogged up and hard and he is not well at all

Distemper in dogs

Following recent outbreaks of Distemper (Hondesiekte in Afrikaans) in Kwa Zulu Natal and Gauteng, it is important to have an understanding of this disease which is fatal in half of all cases of dogs that contract the disease.

My pet injured its eye!

Trauma to the eye- eyelids and cornea

Just like in people, the eye of a dog or cat is a delicate structure that can be affected by a huge number of different conditions. This article will cover trauma to the eyelids, third eyelid and cornea.

The vet could not cure my pet!

Owner Compliance and the Role you as an Owner Play

First things first, there are always 3 parties to any veterinary consultation: The vet, the pet and the one often overlooked, the owner. For any veterinary treatment to be successful at least two of the three parties, namely the vet and the owner, are pivotal to the success of any intervention. As an owner, you are the eyes and ears of the vet in the home environment and most importantly no one knows your pet the way you do. The truth is we the vet cannot do their job without you. I am sure many have heard the saying that

My dog is really getting old

Geriatric dogs - The senior years

Taking your elderly dog to the vet for an annual check-up can sometimes feel like a waste of time and a big inconvenience to the pet involved. The stress involved and the difficulty of transporting a big elderly dog, which is not so mobile anymore, may make you wonder if it is really necessary. The answer is a very big YES!

My cat is really getting old

Geriatric Cats - The senior years

Due to improvements in nutrition, veterinary and home care, cats are living a lot longer than they did twenty to thirty years ago. In the past when a cat reached the age of 13 years old, we believed them to be really old. This is definitely no longer the case. We see several cats that are now reaching ages in excess of twenty years. Cats also tend to age a lot more gracefully than dogs and so it is not always easy to tell when they are starting to struggle or are showing signs of illness.  

My pet is vomiting

Is vomiting a sign of an upset tummy?

Vomiting is one of the most common symptoms of disease seen in pets. It can be quite alarming to see your pet vomit up all his or her food or alternatively continuously wretch and only bring slime or bile. So should you rush your dog or cat to the vet immediately when you see them vomit, or is it safe to wait and see? Because there are so many causes of vomiting, we recommend that if you are ever in doubt, it is always better to visit the vet and have it seen to, even if it is just to

My older German Shepherd Dog seems to be getting weak in its hindquarters

Degenerative Myelopathy

This article outlines a genetic disorder that mainly German Shepherd dogs are prone to. There are other breeds affected by this condition too like Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Corgis, Boxers, Wirehaired Fox Terriers and Rhodesian Ridgebacks, however, the disease is mostly seen in German Shepherds.

Contact Details

Telephone

011 609 0477 

ALT number

076 151 0272

Fax

011 452 1843

After hours emergency

011 705 3411